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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
several years ago. the owner of the jim says it is unlikely the two ever crossed paths. >> one of those injured in the terror attack is a 11-year-old boy martinez boy. there is promising news. he ate his first solid meal since the injury. he was struck in the leg by shrapnel. we have information about several community fund-raisers for aaron and his family posted at abc7news.com under see it on tv. >> people flying to san francisco from boston expressed relief that the second suspect had been captured alive. they also described an eerily quiet city they left behind. john has their story from sfo. >> passengers arriving at sfo had just come from a boston they had never seen before. with the manhunt underway, boston was shut down. no taxis or amtrak for hours. >> it was very quiet. eerily quiet. a lot of people stayed home from work. >> she wore her marathon medal. she had to stop because of the explosion. during the flight the pilot announced that the second suspect had been captured. >> few people clapping. for me it was just relief for my family that lives back there and was dealing wi
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)